Middlebury

LIS Documentation

LIS Documentation

How to Read a citation

Contents

Introduction

To find information for a research paper you can consult a variety of resources, such as Summon, the Internet, or a bibliography in a book or scholarly journal article. Bibliographies are a great way to find additional sources. If the book or article you’re reading is relevant then the books, chapters and articles that it cites probably will be relevant too. The three most common types of material cited in bibliographies are whole books, a chapter or essay in a book and articles in journals. To find them in the library you need to know which one is which.

Book

A book citation will usually include the city and place of publication. For example:

Bader, John B. Dean’s list: eleven habits of highly successful college students. Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press , 2011.

Once you verify that a citation is for a book you can go to our guide Find Books for further information on finding the book either on our shelves or online or how to borrow it through our InterLibrary Loan Service, ILLiad

Chapter in a book

A chapter citation will include the author and title of the chapter followed by “In" and then the title and editor of the book. For example:

Moghadam, A. “The global proliferation of suicide missions.” (In Moghadam, A. The globalization of martyrdom) p 38-61.

Once you verify that a citation is for a chapter in a book you can go to our guide Find Books for further information on finding the book either on our shelves or online or how to borrow it through our InterLibrary Loan Service, ILLiad

Article in a journal or magazine

A journal or magazine article citation usually contains a volume, issue, date, and pagination. For example:

Blair, Ann. "Reading Strategies for Coping With Information Overload ca. 1550-1700" Journal of the History of Ideas 64.1 (Jan., 2003): 11-28.

Once you verify that a citation is for an article you can go to our guide Find Articles for finding the full full text of the article if it is not linked from Summon or other database you have used.

How to Read Citations

A 90 second video from the librarians at Cornell University tells you how to determine if you are looking at a citation for an article, or a book, or a chapter in a book:

How to Read A Citation

For additional information on finding library resources from citations please Ask a Librarian

Powered by MediaWiki