Middlebury

Difference between revisions of "Looking at Digital Media Projects"

m (New page: Take these questions as a guide as you discuss these digital media projects: • Title—Does it capture the essence of the piece and/or forecast what is ahead? • Script—Has the scri...)
 
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Title—Does it capture the essence of the piece and/or forecast what is ahead?
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* Title—Does it capture the essence of the piece and/or forecast what is ahead?
Script—Has the script been sufficiently pared down? Is it interesting? Does it capture our imagination at the beginning? Does it end decisively?
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* Script—Has the script been sufficiently pared down? Is it interesting? Does it capture our imagination at the beginning? Does it end decisively?
Voice—Can we hear the speaker distinctly? Is the voice over too fast or too slow? Can we hear the speaker over the music?
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* Voice—Can we hear the speaker distinctly? Is the voice over too fast or too slow? Can we hear the speaker over the music?
Music—Does it fit the piece? Does it overshadow the voiceover? Does the music go on forever after the visuals are done because we should hear important lyrics, or because the author does not know how to cut the audio?
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* Music—Does it fit the piece? Does it overshadow the voiceover? Does the music go on forever after the visuals are done because we should hear important lyrics, or because the author does not know how to cut the audio?
Stills and Clips—Are they clear? Appropriate? Long enough? Too long?
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* Stills and Clips—Are they clear? Appropriate? Long enough? Too long?
Framing --Are we missing an important section of the clip or picture because the author does not know how to turn off or manipulate the Ken Burns effect?
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* Framing --Are we missing an important section of the clip or picture because the author does not know how to turn off or manipulate the Ken Burns effect?
Credits and Acknowledgements—Do they exist? Can we actually read them? Are they too long or too short?
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* Credits and Acknowledgements—Do they exist? Can we actually read them? Are they too long or too short?
Technical Issues—Any big problems, or does the project seem pretty smooth?
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* Technical Issues—Any big problems, or does the project seem pretty smooth?
Pacing & Timing—Do some parts drag? Do some parts whiz by so fast we have no idea what they are?
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* Pacing & Timing—Do some parts drag? Do some parts whiz by so fast we have no idea what they are?
Transitions and Ken Burns Effect—Have these been used effectively? Not over-used but used appropriately to fit the situation?
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* Transitions and Ken Burns Effect—Have these been used effectively? Not over-used but used appropriately to fit the situation?
Creativity and Wow Factor—anything here that makes you chuckle, smile, weep, nod in approval, or shout, “Yes!” or “I love it!”
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* Creativity and Wow Factor—anything here that makes you chuckle, smile, weep, nod in approval, or shout, “Yes!” or “I love it!”
  
  
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Some Tips for Talks
 
Some Tips for Talks
Speak clearly.  
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* Speak clearly.  
Speak loudly enough to be heard everywhere in the room.  
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* Speak loudly enough to be heard everywhere in the room.  
Rehearse your talk (and time yourself).  
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* Rehearse your talk (and time yourself).  
Keep within your time limit.  
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* Keep within your time limit.  
Make eye contact whenever possible.  
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* Make eye contact whenever possible.  
Begin and end decisively.  
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* Begin and end decisively.  
Take a slow deep breath or two before speaking.  
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* Take a slow deep breath or two before speaking.  
Organize your talk well, but don't be afraid to speak spontaneously if you become inspired. Relax--it's just your class!
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* Organize your talk well, but don't be afraid to speak spontaneously if you become inspired. Relax--it's just your class!

Revision as of 02:15, 12 November 2007

Take these questions as a guide as you discuss these digital media projects:


  • Title—Does it capture the essence of the piece and/or forecast what is ahead?
  • Script—Has the script been sufficiently pared down? Is it interesting? Does it capture our imagination at the beginning? Does it end decisively?
  • Voice—Can we hear the speaker distinctly? Is the voice over too fast or too slow? Can we hear the speaker over the music?
  • Music—Does it fit the piece? Does it overshadow the voiceover? Does the music go on forever after the visuals are done because we should hear important lyrics, or because the author does not know how to cut the audio?
  • Stills and Clips—Are they clear? Appropriate? Long enough? Too long?
  • Framing --Are we missing an important section of the clip or picture because the author does not know how to turn off or manipulate the Ken Burns effect?
  • Credits and Acknowledgements—Do they exist? Can we actually read them? Are they too long or too short?
  • Technical Issues—Any big problems, or does the project seem pretty smooth?
  • Pacing & Timing—Do some parts drag? Do some parts whiz by so fast we have no idea what they are?
  • Transitions and Ken Burns Effect—Have these been used effectively? Not over-used but used appropriately to fit the situation?
  • Creativity and Wow Factor—anything here that makes you chuckle, smile, weep, nod in approval, or shout, “Yes!” or “I love it!”


What is the most important suggestion for improvement you can make about this project? Share with the author.


Some Tips for Talks

  • Speak clearly.
  • Speak loudly enough to be heard everywhere in the room.
  • Rehearse your talk (and time yourself).
  • Keep within your time limit.
  • Make eye contact whenever possible.
  • Begin and end decisively.
  • Take a slow deep breath or two before speaking.
  • Organize your talk well, but don't be afraid to speak spontaneously if you become inspired. Relax--it's just your class!
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