Middlebury

Difference between revisions of "Wikis"

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[[Category:Web-Content Platforms]]
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The term 'Wiki' is the Hawaiian-language term for 'quick'<ref>Wikipedia entry on Wikis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki</ref>. [[Wikis]] are a form of collaboratively-editable websites, the most famous of which is [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Wikipedia]. While many CMS tools also allow for collaborative editing of content, Wikis excel at unrestricted and free-form creation. Wikis generally use a simplified markup format, known as [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Cheatsheet Wiki-text] and allow for links to pages and topics that do not yet exist. Rather than providing a detailed authorization system to limit who can modify what content, Wikis will instead allow anyone to make changes, but make it easy to roll-back vandalism. This allows wikis to more easily draw a large number of contributers than a more restrictive system, at the expense of control over user-actions.
 
The term 'Wiki' is the Hawaiian-language term for 'quick'<ref>Wikipedia entry on Wikis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki</ref>. [[Wikis]] are a form of collaboratively-editable websites, the most famous of which is [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Wikipedia]. While many CMS tools also allow for collaborative editing of content, Wikis excel at unrestricted and free-form creation. Wikis generally use a simplified markup format, known as [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Cheatsheet Wiki-text] and allow for links to pages and topics that do not yet exist. Rather than providing a detailed authorization system to limit who can modify what content, Wikis will instead allow anyone to make changes, but make it easy to roll-back vandalism. This allows wikis to more easily draw a large number of contributers than a more restrictive system, at the expense of control over user-actions.
  
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* [[MediaWiki]] - The software you are looking at right now.
 
* [[MediaWiki]] - The software you are looking at right now.
 
* [[Moodle]] - Has a simple wiki module
 
* [[Moodle]] - Has a simple wiki module
* [[Segue]] - Supports wiki-style linking to content, pages, and sites.
 
  
 
==Other Wiki Software==
 
==Other Wiki Software==
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Latest revision as of 09:37, 5 April 2012

The term 'Wiki' is the Hawaiian-language term for 'quick'[1]. Wikis are a form of collaboratively-editable websites, the most famous of which is Wikipedia. While many CMS tools also allow for collaborative editing of content, Wikis excel at unrestricted and free-form creation. Wikis generally use a simplified markup format, known as Wiki-text and allow for links to pages and topics that do not yet exist. Rather than providing a detailed authorization system to limit who can modify what content, Wikis will instead allow anyone to make changes, but make it easy to roll-back vandalism. This allows wikis to more easily draw a large number of contributers than a more restrictive system, at the expense of control over user-actions.

Wiki Software

Midd-Supported

  • MediaWiki - The software you are looking at right now.
  • Moodle - Has a simple wiki module

Other Wiki Software

On the Wiki Matrix you can compare the features of the vast majority of common wiki platforms.

References

  1. Wikipedia entry on Wikis. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki
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