Difference between revisions of "Interface"

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(New page: The term '''Interface''' as related to this class most likely refers to the notion of a user "Interface." A user interface consists of both an input and an output, but refers in total to ...)
 
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The term '''Interface''' as related to this class most likely refers to the notion of a user "Interface."  A user interface consists of both an input and an output, but refers in total to the collective means of human interaction with machines, computers, or other complex devices.  The interface allows humans to manipulate a complex system which they otherwise could not operate.  Computer keyboards are an example of a ''Graphical Interface'', where input entered through the keys produce a visual output on the monitor.  ''Tangible Interfaces'', place more emphasis on physical interaction within the environment.  New video game Interfaces emerging today are constantly working to alter our engagement with gaming software.  The Nintendo Wii is an example of how a user interface often times is more crucial to an experience than is the actual software.  As interfaces evolve, the [[interactivity]] of human beings with technologically advanced systems will increase our ability to experience technology in entirely new ways.
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The term '''Interface''' as related to this class most likely refers to the notion of a user "Interface."  A user interface consists of both an input and an output, but refers in total to the collective means of human interaction with machines, computers, or other complex devices.  The interface allows humans to manipulate a complex system which they otherwise could not operate.  Computer keyboards are an example of a ''Graphical Interface'', where input entered through the keys produce a visual output on the monitor.  ''Tangible Interfaces'', place more emphasis on physical interaction within the environment.  New video game Interfaces emerging today are constantly working to alter our engagement with gaming software.  The Nintendo Wii is an example of how a user interface often times is more crucial to an experience than is the actual software.  As interfaces evolve, the [[interactivity]] of human beings with technologically advanced systems will increase our ability to experience technology in entirely new ways. Today's changing interface changes our response to games. For example, when playing Guitar Hero, a gamer feels like they are actually playing the guitar, or at least more so than if it were a standard controller. It can be argued that you feel more in control when using a guitar or Wii remote becaue you are actually physically doing the activity, not depending on some buttons. Being active and standing up also allows for more spectators, who want to see not only the game, but also how you are playing the game. There is a showmanship to games like Guitar Hero. Gamers can add a style and "flair" to the way they play a game. A game like Guitar Hero builds off the idea of playing the guitar, and provides rewards for it--star power, points, and cheering fans. That's not something you get by playing the real guitar. And it wouldn't be the same excitement if you were using a playstation controller because you feel like you had the dexterity to play the guitar, not a videogame. 
  
 
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http://wii.com/ Nintendo Wii
 
http://wii.com/ Nintendo Wii
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http://www.guitarherogame.com/gh2/

Revision as of 09:36, 22 May 2007

The term Interface as related to this class most likely refers to the notion of a user "Interface." A user interface consists of both an input and an output, but refers in total to the collective means of human interaction with machines, computers, or other complex devices. The interface allows humans to manipulate a complex system which they otherwise could not operate. Computer keyboards are an example of a Graphical Interface, where input entered through the keys produce a visual output on the monitor. Tangible Interfaces, place more emphasis on physical interaction within the environment. New video game Interfaces emerging today are constantly working to alter our engagement with gaming software. The Nintendo Wii is an example of how a user interface often times is more crucial to an experience than is the actual software. As interfaces evolve, the interactivity of human beings with technologically advanced systems will increase our ability to experience technology in entirely new ways. Today's changing interface changes our response to games. For example, when playing Guitar Hero, a gamer feels like they are actually playing the guitar, or at least more so than if it were a standard controller. It can be argued that you feel more in control when using a guitar or Wii remote becaue you are actually physically doing the activity, not depending on some buttons. Being active and standing up also allows for more spectators, who want to see not only the game, but also how you are playing the game. There is a showmanship to games like Guitar Hero. Gamers can add a style and "flair" to the way they play a game. A game like Guitar Hero builds off the idea of playing the guitar, and provides rewards for it--star power, points, and cheering fans. That's not something you get by playing the real guitar. And it wouldn't be the same excitement if you were using a playstation controller because you feel like you had the dexterity to play the guitar, not a videogame.


Links

http://wii.com/ Nintendo Wii http://www.guitarherogame.com/gh2/