Middlebury UG Courses

From Linguistics
Jump to: navigation, search

THERE ARE MANY COURSE LISTINGS FOR WHICH WE WELCOME DESCRIPTIONS BY EDITING THIS PAGE WITH UPDATES OR NEW ADDITIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION - CONTACT KEVIN HURLEY khurley@middlebury.edu

Middlebury Linguistic Courses

SOAN 0359 Language and Power (Not offered 2008-09) Sheridan
This course is an introduction to both linguistic anthropology and political anthropology. Communication patterns are always mediated by cultural processes, social inequality, and power, so in this course we will investigate cross-cultural examples of how language, discourse, and representation relate to inequality, power, and resistance. Topics will include sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, gendered language practices, political discourse, and theoretical approaches to power (Marx, Foucault, and Bourdieu) (SOAN 0103) 3hrs. lect./disc. SOC


NTD/ITAL 0201 Introduction to Romance Linguistics (Spring 2008) A. Barashkov
This course welcomes students and speakers of French, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish who are curious about linguistics and wish to undertake a comparative study of the Romance linguistic family as a whole. We shall survey the basic principles and methods of the linguistic science and immediately apply them to the rich and fascinating data drawn from the history of the Romance languages. Through alternating internal (structural) and external (socio-cultural) approaches to the study of languages, our goal is to construct a coherent vision of unity and diversity that at once characterize the native languages of more than 900 million speakers worldwide. No previous experience in linguistics is required but a good knowledge of at least one Romance language is obligatory. (Approval required; Two semesters of a Romance language study) 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC CMP EUR 


ARBC/INTD 0111 The Unity and Diversity of Human Language (Spring 2008) U. Soltan

https://segue1.middlebury.edu/sites/intd0111a-f06

In this course we will introduce the main issues in the study of linguistic diversity: how languages differ and how they are the same (language families, language contact, and language universals), diversity in geographical and social dialects, "language emergence" of pidgins and creoles, "language death" and endangered languages, linguistic history and language change, as well as the major theoretical approaches to the study of linguistic diversity. Linguistic data will be drawn from a wide variety of languages, and linguistic phenomena will relate primarily to aspects of word formation (morphology) and sentence structure (syntax). 3 hrs. lect/disc. SOC


ARBC/INTD 0112 Introduction to Linguistics (not scheduled 08/09) Soltan

https://segue1.middlebury.edu/sites/intd0112a-s07

This is an introductory course in linguistics taught in English. The main topics will include the nature of human language as distinct from other communication systems; the subsystems of linguistic knowledge, i.e., sound patterns (phonology), word-formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; language use in context; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. 3 hrs. lect./disc.


GRMN 440: Structure of German (Fall 2009) Feiereisen
The course simultaneously presents an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to the German language and a discussion of how today’s Standard German evolved. Attention is paid to important concepts in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition to these theoretical and descriptive aspects, we will discuss sociolinguistic issues such as language and gender and regional variations within Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Luxemburg. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. 3 hrs. lect./disc.